Analog photo techniques you should know

Here are 9 Analog Photography Techniques you’ll want to know

Historically the idea of capturing images and finding a way to keep them has been around for many years. When I came across the analog photography methods we present here I decided to look more closely at the origins to see what brought us here.

I learned from this reference (http://inventors.about.com/od/pstartinventions/a/stilphotography.htm) that the word Photography is derived from the Greek words photos (“light”) and graphein (“to draw”). It was coined by the scientist Sir John F.W. Herschel in 1839 to describe a method of recording images by the action of light on a sensitive material. But the use of cameras dates much further back.

Alhazen (Ibn Al-Haytham), was a great authority on optics who lived around 1000AD and invented the first pinhole camera, also called the Camera Obscura, and was able to explain why the images were upside down. But it wasn’t until 1827 that the first true photographic image was created. Joseph Nicephore Niepce created sun prints as they were called by letting light draw the picture. And we’ve progressed from there.

On our way to current cameras and photographic techniques we passed through an era that saw us create many different and interesting techniques for creating photos. They included the nine methods you can explore in the article we feature here. The methods described and discussed include:

Heliography

analog1hieroglyph

 

Daguerreotype

analog2daguerrotype

 

And Photogravure among others

analog3photogravure

 

You can see the styles and efforts and techniques used to create them in this article.
https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-9-analogue-photography-techniques-you-need-to-know

Let us know what you think.

Walter Krieg
wkrieg@dotphoto.com
http://www.dotphoto.com

Author: dotphoto

Glenn Paul is President and Co-Founder of dotPhoto, which began life in 2000 as a photo printing service and now also distributes user-generated media in Flash, video and on cell phones.

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