What is optical image stabilization?

Optical Image Stabilization (OIS) explained…

As we try to improve our photo taking…we work to make sure that our photos are clear and sharp with the proper resolution. We try hard to hold a steady hand as we snap our photos. But as we all know, that’s not always enough. If we can get the camera to help us it may make things a whole lot easier.

Help might be on the way. It looks like new cameras, even on our smart phones, might just be getting ready to do the job by not only adding a feature called Optical Image Stabilization but improving it immensely.

Optical Image Stabilization has been around commercially since the mid-90s when it started being used in compact cameras and SLR lenses as a method of letting photographers shoot longer exposures without needing a tripod. It works by moving lens elements to counteract wobbly hand-induced camera shake, thereby reducing blur.

Our writer tells us that not only are SLR and similar cameras coming equipped with improved OIS, but new smart phone models are as well. If this is true and, given our desire to use our smart phones for more and more of our photography, should we look forward to this feature as a true benefit?

and should my next smart phone have it?

Simon Crisp tells us…

“The cameras in our smartphones keep getting better as they gain tech and features previously reserved for high-end cameras. One such example is Optical Image Stabilization (OIS) which promises less blurry images and smoother video. Here we look at exactly what OIS is, how it works, and whether it’s a feature you’ll want in your next smartphone.” Let’s take a look…

Here’s what we might be able to look forward to

OISinSmartPhones

 

See more of what Simon has to say here: http://www.gizmag.com/what-is-ois-optical-image-stabilization/42212/
Walter
wkrieg@dotphoto.com
www.dotphoto.com

Author: dotphoto

Glenn Paul is President and Co-Founder of dotPhoto, which began life in 2000 as a photo printing service and now also distributes user-generated media in Flash, video and on cell phones.

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